A Quilt Along, Applique quilt projects, Dresden Plate Quilt, Halloween quilts, Mini Dresden Patterns, New quilt pattern

Candy Corn Sampler Quilt-Along Step 6, Dresden Pumpkin Blocks

Welcome to Step 6 of making your Candy Corn Sampler!

Thanks for sharing pics on our FB group, Sewing With Susan!

Step 6 is Dresden Pumpkin Blocks.

No need to make the flying geese blocks today,

but you’re going to need to make them sooner or later, lol.

I borrowed these blocks from my new-ish Dresden Pumpkins table runner pattern.

2 Tiny Dresden plates for today & tomorrow.

You’ll need these…

Refer to page 11, for the complete instructions.

A couple more leaves for this block.

If you remember the leaf making video I showed you, use the small bar w beveled end for the straight parts of the leaf then use the pointed end for the round parts.

If you don’t already have Apliquick Bars & Bohin glue you can find them & all the tools that I use for my appliqué on my website by clicking here.

More tiny blind hem stitch for the circle & leaf appliqué.

Can’t wait to see your pumpkins!

If you’re not already a member of my Sewing With Susan Facebook group, please join & share pics.

Find the group by clicking here to join.

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, Applique quilt projects, Dresden Plate Quilt, Halloween quilts, Mini Dresden Patterns, New quilt pattern

Candy Corn Sampler Quilt-Along Step 3, HOOT Block

Welcome to Step 3 of making your Candy Corn Sampler!

Thanks for sharing pics on our FB group, Sewing With Susan!

Let’s start Step 3!

Tiny Dresden plates are the main topic for today.

Tip for today is to spray & iron all of your fabrics with Mary Ellen’s Best Press. Your plates will lie flatter when they’re complete.

I use the hand pump bottle when spraying yardage & the finger pump bottle when I’m spraying my finished plates or blocks. Its spray is really fine & won’t super saturate the small pieces & make them go wonky.

Refer to page 7, “HOOT Block” to get started.

Good news, Step 4 will be a lighter load, so if you’re feeling overwhelmed, sorry, but maybe you can use Thursday & Friday to get caught up.

I again chose to use freezer paper machine appliqué method for this block.

If, like I mentioned in Step 2, you cut multiple appliqué templates at once for the birds, you’re saving time! If not, you can still do so since there are more birds on this quilt.

Just stack up to 6 layers of freezer paper a bit larger than the shape to cut out & staple a template on top.

(Be sure the freezer paper is stacked up correctly. Notice some birds on the quilt face right & some face left, but you can cut them all at once. See notes on each block’s instructions)

Using serrated scissors helps to cut through lots of layers. I use a staple remover to remove the staple without tearing the paper layers.

You know I love this part of the quilt!

Having the right tools makes all the difference!

Use your favorite appliqué method!

Below I show how to manipulate a point with my favorite tools; Apliquick Bars. Use this short video to help with the birds.

Here I show how simple it is to manipulate a circle. Yes, simple! Just practice.

You’ll need them for the Tiny Dresden plates.

If you don’t already have Apliquick Bars & Bohin glue you can find them & all the tools that I use for my appliqué on my website by clicking here.

Be sure you have enough contrast between the background fabric and appliqué pieces then position all the appliqué on the background fabric then glue (or fuse) it in place.

“HOOT” is going to be a tight fit, just be sure you position the letters inside the 1/4″ seam allowance.

I do A LOT of fabric auditioning while designing a quilt. I originally designed this quilt with white birds so that’s where I went with them.

Choosing the right center circles is yet another decision…

My double guessing of myself just wastes time!

For some reason I thought the white birds were too stark so I made black birds.

Obviously they were too dark for me!

As you can see, my original idea of white birds was perfect! I think what makes it work is the pretty black designs in the light cream fabrics.

What I’ve learned over the years is that I like low contrast in fabrics across my quilts. You may think my quilts are too busy, if so, you probably like high or at least more contrast. Make your birds stark white, or maybe orange! lol

Good grief, grandma!!! Lol

I love of the tiny blind hem stitch* for plates & freezer paper appliqué. Done small enough it resembles hand stitching. If you don’t know what I mean, use the blind hem setting, but make the stitch length & width very small. *IF your machine won’t let you adjust the blind hem stitch, use a different one!

#1 rule, have fun oh, & ask questions!

If you’re not already a member of my Sewing With Susan Facebook group, please join & share pics.

Find the group by clicking here to join.

I can’t wait to see your HOOT blocks & your bird fabric choices!

If you have any appliqué questions you can ask them there too.

If you’re still undecided on your fabrics

you can order your Candy Corn Sampler kit today from Need’l Love by clicking here.

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, Applique quilt projects, Dresden Plate Quilt, Halloween quilts, Mini Dresden Patterns, New quilt pattern

Candy Corn Sampler Quilt-Along Step 1, Candy Corn Blocks

Hello from Emma, my little pumpkin spice baby, & me!

Welcome long-time followers & all of my new followers

to Step 1 of making your Candy Corn Sampler!

I’m glad you’re taking this sewing journey with us to make my newest favorite quilt.

Hopefully you’ve made at least a few fabric decisions…

This Hootenanny fat 1/4 pack was a large part of my inspiration for this Candy Corn Sampler Quilt. It looks nice with this Grunge piece, don’t you think? I didn’t end up using it but Grunge goes with almost everything!

If you’re still undecided on your fabrics you can order your Candy Corn Sampler kit today from Need’l Love by clicking here.

Let’s start with Step 1!

My first step with any quilting these days is to spray & iron all of my fabrics with Mary Ellen’s Best Press. It doesn’t make the fabric stiff like starch does. It gives it more body & helps it press flatter which is really helpful especially when working with little pieces of fabric. I’ve also noticed that if I need to reposition something & press it again the first creases will press out unlike the results of using regular starch.

I use the hand pump bottle when spraying yardage & the finger pump bottle when I’m spraying my finished plates or blocks. Its spray is really fine & won’t super saturate the small pieces & make them go wonky.

The next task is to start cutting & making candy corns!

Refer to page 4, “Candy Corn Blocks” & “Cutting” to cut the strips then sew the strip sets together. Next, refer to the cutting diagram to cut the “trees”.

NOTE: Do not rotate the template to cut the candy corns or half of your candy corns will be upside down!

The in-between triangles will be discarded or if you’re like me, put away for another day…

Follow assembly instructions, page 4, to make the blocks. I sewed these blocks on my featherweight machine. That was fun!

In case you noticed, “real” candy corn has orange in the middle, but I prefer my fabric candy corn to have the orange on the outside.

Sew the left background onto the candy corn then press.

Sew the right background onto the candy corn then press again. Don’t forget to do the little bit of trimming. These blocks should measure 3 1/2” x 4 1/4”.

Make 48. Don’t worry, they go quickly & you have 2 days to make them (just 1 per hour lol) before we move on to Step 2!

Emma says they’re a snap!

If you’re using super cute fabric who cares how long they take?

I played with one of the super cute Hootenanny rick rack stripes to make a few trees too. I’m not sure where they’ll end up.

I love the ease & accuracy of this block’s construction. ❤️ I hope you do too!

If you’re not already a member of my Sewing With Susan Facebook group, please join & share pics.

Find it by clicking here to join.

I can’t wait to see your candy corn blocks.

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, My Life

Do You Love Red & Green Antique Quilts?

You’re in for a treat if you’ve always wanted to

make your own red & green antique quilt.

My good friend, Robin, of Nestlings by Robin

has created an absolute masterpiece!!!

Just today she introduced her PDF pattern for sale

& for a limited time it’s at an introductory rate.

 

She’s also hosting a Quilt-Along starting soon to keep you motivated.

Check out her blog for details &

join her Facebook group to be a part of the buzz!

 

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, Sew-

Quarantiny Quilt Assembly Progress

Yesterday I finally sat to assemble my

Quarantiny Sew-Along Quilt

that has been hanging out on my design wall for a while.

I’m glad that I was able to let it percolate

while I spent a lot of time preparing for virtual Spring Quilt Market

which also involved having a brand new website built.

While it was hanging out on my design wall

I realized the best way to sew the tiny 3″ blocks together

was not by sewing them into rows,

but instead by sewing them into blocks.

So, yesterday that’s what I did.

16 tiny blocks at a time I assembled the quilt.

This June Tailor Cut ‘n Press worked great transporting the blocks

to my sewing machine so I didn’t get them out of order.

Something else I discovered while watching this hang out

on my design wall for so long is that since there was such variety in the blocks,

some 4-patch, some 9-patch yet others not equidistant blocks at all,

many of the seams didn’t line up with the neighboring blocks

which made it SO MUCH EASIER to sew them together!

When I discovered this back in May,

I contemplated rearranging the blocks so no 2 blocks’

seams would line up (can you spell O.C.D.???)

but I decided against that crazy idea!

As it turned out,

very few of the blocks’ seams lined up anyway.

 

I so enjoyed sewing the blocks together!

I put in my new DVD of

 

www.gstatic.com/tv/thumb/v22vodart/17008397/p17...

If you know me at all, you know that I love this version too

Little Women (1994 film) - Wikipedia

& have watched it at least 100 times!

OK watched may not be the correct word, more like listened to.

Anyway, soon the 128 tiny 3″ blocks were assembled

into 8 blocks ready to be sewn around my cute sewing machine!

I’m excited & a bit sad that the top is finished & ready to be quilted!

 

This is the first time that I clipped seam allowances to help the seams lie flatter.

Have you ever done this?

You clip on either side of bulky seams

so the seam kind of flip flops directions

in the middle of a seam instead of being pressed all one way or open.

Clip almost, but not quite to the stitches of the seam.

I figured this would not be washed so it should be OK.

It sure makes the bulky seams lie flat!

Look how nice the back looks!

This was so much fun.

Thanks to all of you who sewed along with me!

You can see how others made their Quarantiny quilts on my Facebook group

Sewing With Susan by clicking here.

I’m excited to have it quilted & then to bind it.

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, My Life

1-A-Day, 3″ Blocks, The Puzzle!

It’s now time for the really fun part of our Quarantiny quilts!

It’s time to work the puzzle game.

 

Remember these?

Time to arrange

then rearrange

& arrange some more

the blocks into the most pleasing setting!

It will probably take me a while to make a final decision

then start sewing the quilt together.

I decided on 128 blocks to arrange for color, value & block name.

Have you seen the options I showed on my Sewing With Susan FB page

if you’ve not made this many blocks?

Here’s an option for just 20 tiny 3″ blocks.

 

An option for 48 tiny 3″ blocks.

 

 

An option for 84 blocks.

 

 

Just by adding another circle of blocks around the center block

changes the block count drastically.

My quilt will be 36 1/2″ x 36 1/2″ when I sew the blocks together.

 

 

I may have another piece of Thimbleberries fabric

that I could spare for a border or 2 or 6!

I hope you’re excited to work on your quilt too.

Let’s get to work!

Show us your progress at my Sewing With Susan FB Group.

We want to see you’re thinking/making too!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SewingWithSusan/

 

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, My Life

1-A-Day, 3″ Blocks — Appliqué Sewing Machine

  Appliqué Sewing Machine Day

Today we’ll appliqué the machine to the background block.

I had to choose a background print

from my incredibly cool Thimbleberries cart!

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cut

  • 13″ square of background fabric (will be trimmed to 12  1/2″)

 

Since I used the freezer paper technique

for machine appliqué I’ll show those steps today.

Feel free to use another form of appliqué,

fusible web, needle turn, etc.

Hopefully you have a 12  1/2″ x 12  1/2″ ruler.

By laying the ruler on the background square

you will be able to line up the appliqué

shape to see where to position it.

(The background should extend 1/4″ around the outside of the ruler.)

Put the bottom of the machine 2  3/4″

above the bottom of the ruler.

Pin the top of the machine in place.

Fold up the bottom of the machine to glue the edges.

Press glued edges to background fabric.

Unpin the appliqué then fold it down

to glue remaining edges.

Press remaining edges to background fabric.

Use the 12  1/2″ ruler to press entire

appliqué to background fabric to set the glue.

Stitch sewing machine appliqué shape to background.

I used a tiny blind hem stitch

with thread matching the sewing machine.

This is the same stitch that I use

to appliqué the Dresden plates.

With very sharp, small scissors,

CAREFULLY

cut slits in the background fabric

behind the sewing machine.

Be sure to go all around the shape

so you can reach all corners of the paper later.

Now the scary part…

Wet the entire sewing machine,

front & back, under running water.

Be sure to get the entire applique shape wet.

Let it rest a few minutes.

If you’re an impatient person I recommend taking

a walk around your house several times!

You don’t want to remove the

freezer paper until the glue is dissolved!!!

When you’re sure the glue is dissolved,

work your way around the sewing machine

GENTLY

pulling diagonally on the block

to release the stitches from the freezer paper.

If the freezer paper doesn’t easily pop free,

get it wetter!

You don’t want to pull the stitches

away from the sewing machine!

Once the freezer paper is free, pull it out.

It comes out mostly whole,

except in the tight areas.

I used a pin to pull the paper from the needle,

top of hand wheel & spool.

Once the freezer paper is all removed,

set the block to dry.

I like to set these on my kitchen table

& turn the ceiling fan to for a quick dry.

Pressing a wet block will distort it!

Ask me how I know…

Once it’s dry, spray & press

with Mary Ellen’s Best Press.

Align ruler with bottom of machine 2  3/4″ from bottom of ruler.

Bottom corners of machine should be 1″ from the left side

& 1″ from right side.

Trim to 12  1/2″ x 12  1/2″.

Show us your blocks at my Sewing With Susan FB Group.

We want to see your progress too!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SewingWithSusan/

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, My Life

1-A-Day, 3″ Blocks — Sewing Machine Day

  Sewing Machine Day

Now that we probably have enough 3″ blocks…

Let’s make this cute sewing machine today!

 

I had a hard time deciding what black

Thimbleberries fabric to choose from my cart!

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Click this link to download the sewing machine

Sewing+With+Susan+QuaranTiny+Sewing+Machine

that I designed specifically for our quilt.

Note that it is reversed for you.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I used the freezer paper technique

for the sewing machine appliqué.

If you’re not familiar with freezer paper applique,

just trace the design onto the paper side of the freezer paper.

Cut out the sewing machine.

Fuse the wax side to the wrong side of fabric.

Cut out sewing machine with 1/8″ seam allowance.

I used my wonderful Apliquick Bars

and Bohin Glue pen to glue the seam allowance

to the freezer paper.

If you’re not familiar with the technique

of inner corners, outer corners and points,

take a look at Rosa’s wonderful YouTube video

for easy instructions that really work!

Feel free to use fusible web, needle turn,

or whatever method of appliqué is your favorite.

Show us your blocks at my Sewing With Susan FB Group.

We want to see your progress too!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SewingWithSusan/

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, My Life

1-A-Day, 3″ Blocks — Bitsy Dresden Plate

  It’s Bitsy Dresden Plate Block Day!!!

The day you’ve all been waiting for!

Today we’ll make this adorable, irresistible cutie.

I had more fun going through my Thimbleberries cart!

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cut:

  • 1 Dresden petal strip 1  1/2″ x 14″
  • 1 background sq. 3  3/4″ (will be trimmed to 3  1/2″)
  • 1 center fabric sq. 1  1/2″
  • 1 freezer paper sq. 1  1/4″

 

Cutting the petals

If you have my Tiny Dresden Plate Template

you can use it with a bit of retrofitting that I’ll show you below.

Since I’ve modified the template in the past 5 years

to make it easier to use and store

your petal cutting will depend on what version

of my Tiny Dresden Plate Template you have.

Either 1. line up the bottom of “Plate Template” with the edge of the fabric

(don’t cut off the top! extend cutting past the template).

or 2. draw a line 1  1/4″ from narrow edge of template

then align that line with the edge of the fabric strip

(don’t cut off the top! extend cutting past the template).

or 3. print out the pdf below and use that template.

Bitsty+Dresden+Plate+templates

 

Whichever of the 3 options you decide to use,

cut 12 Bitsy Dresden petals,

rotating the template on the strip.

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

All seams to be sewn a scant 1/4″.

Use a Seam guide by Perkins Dry Goods

if you’re unsure of where that is on your machine!

Available here on my notions page

along with the rest of the tools that I recommend.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Fold each petal in half right sides together,

then sew from raw edge to fold as shown.

Sew all 12 petals.

Trim away seam allowance as shown.

Press flat as sewn, then turn right side out.

Using That Purple Thang

or other blunt point,

poke out point of petal.

Press again.

Do this for all 12 petals.

Sew 2 petals together (right sides together)

starting 3 stitches from edge,

back stitch to edge, then sew entire seam.

Press as sewn, then press seam open.

This is the only time I trim these seams.

I trimmed them down to about 1/8″

only because if you don’t they’ll be caught in the neighboring seams.

Sew pairs of petals together.

Press.

Sew 3 segments together to complete plate.

By extending the petals by 1/4″ when we cut them out

there is no opening in the center,

but that extra 1/4″ made the petals easier to hold onto

while assembling the plate

& also allows for a smaller circle

to be appliqued over the center.

Wow!

Just 2  1/2″!

Perfect for our 3″ finished blocks.

❤️❤️❤️

Trace, then cut 3/4″ circle from the pdf above from freezer paper.

Fuse to wrong side of center fabric.

Cut out fabric with 1/8″ seam allowance.

With Roxanne

or other glue &

Apliquick rods,

glue seam allowance to back side of template.

These tools make my circle almost perfect!

See, no divots!!!

Glue circle to center of plate.

Crease the background square in half both directions.

Align seams of plate with the creases.

Glue plate in place.

Appliqué center to plate with thread matching center

then appliqué plate to background with thread matching plate.

I use a tiny blind hem stitch.

With small, very sharp, pointed scissors,

cut away first the background fabric 1/8″ inside

the center circle appliqué stitches

then cut away the center of the Dresden plate petals.

The freezer paper should prevent you

from accidentally cutting the circle fabric!

Dampen center circle.

Let rest a few minutes then remove paper template.

A slight pull on 2 opposite petals will release the paper template

& it will come right out of the hole in 1 piece!

When dry, press with Mary Ellen’s Best Press.

Trim block to 3  1/2″.

❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

Show us your blocks at my Sewing With Susan FB Group.

We want to see your progress too!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SewingWithSusan/

 

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan

A Quilt Along, My Life

1-A-Day, 3″ Blocks — Antique Tile

  Antique Tile Block

Today we’ll make this cutie.

I enjoyed using more pieces from my Thimbleberries cart today!

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cut:

  • 4 black recs. 1″ x 1  1/2″
  • 4 black sqs. 1″
  • 1 cream strip 1″ x 7″
  • 1 blue strip 1″ x 7″
  • 4 blue sqs. 1″
  • 1 blue sq. 1  1/2″

Sew together the 1″ x 7″ strips on one long side.

Press the seam open or to 1 side.

I tried it both ways with the same results.

If you want more assurance of perfectly matching seams

I’d recommend pressing every seam toward the blue fabric.

It’s easier to nest seams that are pressed to 1 side instead of open.

Cut 4 segments 1  1/2″.

 

Sew each 1″ blue square to a 1″ black square.

Make 2 “left” units & 2 “right” units

by next sewing a 1″ x 1  1/2″ black rectangle

to either the right side or left side of each 2-square unit.

See below.

Arrange the segments then sew the block.

I experimented with the pressing of these seams as well

with no evidence that one way was better than the other!

Have fun & make a couple or few or 10 more!

I find it intriguing how different each of these blocks look

depending on the value of the fabrics in the different positions.

Show us your blocks at my Sewing With Susan FB Group.

We want to see your progress too!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/SewingWithSusan/

Just Keep Sewing…

Susan